Baby Names inspired by Occupation

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Posted on: March 5th, 2019by Elizabeth Henderson

What is it in the name? This is the question that most people ask when you tell them your name. Many individuals do not know how to respond to this question. The answer is quite simple really. When someone asks you this question, respond by giving a brief history of your name and the meaning as well. It is easier for one to better understand the name by relating the meaning to the history. For example, the name David means beloved of God. Nevertheless, how is one to understand this meaning without knowing the history of this man and the nature of relationship between him and his creator? In this article, I will highlight a sample of names that are inspired by occupation. I hope that in doing so, I can help you understand the importance of these names to their original cultures and probably how they can be adopted by the millennial.

Archer is as straightforward as it is. This name originated from the profession of archery. Originally, it was an occupational surname for the bowmen in Britain. Even so, today, it is used as a first name for baby boys. The hierarchy of the ancient kingdom was such that the king and the queen were at the apex, assisted by the bishops, followed by the knights and then the military men. This made bishops very important persons during this generation. As time went by, the title was adopted as the surname before it later became a first name. Today, Bishop is a common first name in many western societies. Bailey is an Old English name. This name was derived from baili, which was the term used to refer to an administrator in the Old French culture. Currently, Bailey is a girl's first name.

Baker was a medieval surname. In the Middle English society, the name existed as bekere and in Old English as baecere. All this time, the meaning of the name remained the same. Baker was the title for the one who worked wheat into bread. Presently, it is still mostly used as a surname but it is slowly gaining traction as a popular first name for baby boys. Booker is an English name that originated from the profession of handling books. In the Old English, it appeared as bocere. In the Old English culture, Carter was the title for the individual who specialized in transporting goods. Carter has been used for a surname for many generations. However, it is gaining momentum as an independent first name. Dexter was the title for the dye professional in Old English. Later, it was adopted as a surname before turning into a given name. Duke was the title for the royalty ruler just below the prince or princess. The title became a surname in the Middle English culture, and later a first name for baby boys.

Fallon was the title for the leader in ancient Irish culture. Today, it is a unisex given name. Similarly, Ferris was adopted from those who worked with stones to create items. Gage originated from the Old French culture. It was a title for the individual who administered an oath. Gage is a unisex first name. Harper is a Middle English name for the professional harp players. Hunter is also a Middle English name for the people who earned their living by hunting wild animals. Harper is a popular first name for baby girls while Hunter is for the baby boys. In the Anglo-Saxon Britain leadership hierarchy, knight was the title for the highest-ranking officer and the king's guard. The ambition of every soldier was to be a knight at one point in his life. The title is so important that today the queen honours the British citizens with the most outstanding achievements by knighting them. Knight has metamorphosed into a masculine first name.

Lander was the title for those who lived in the countryside and were the natives of the land. They practiced farming for sustenance. After many generations, this title has become a first name for baby boys. Marshall is still dominantly used as a surname but is slowly being adopted as a first name. In the Old Anglophone culture, Marshall was the title for the individual who tendered for the horses. Mason was the title given to the one who worked with stones. Currently, Mason is a masculine given name in many European cultures. Mercer is a unisex first name. Historically, Mercer was a title used by both the Scots and the English when referring to the merchant. The name has maintained the same spelling and pronunciation since inception.

Paige is a unisex given name, even though it is mostly used for girls. Paige was the Middle English title for the young servant. It was mostly used for the lads newly enrolled to train as knights. Palmer was the Old French and Middle English title for the one who worked with the palm trees. The name Parker was the title for the keeper of the park in the Old French society. Piper was the Romanian title for the flute player. It is used as a feminine first name. Poet was the Old English title for the one who wrote verses. Ryder was the mounted warrier in the Anglophone culture. Skylar is a German name meaning the little warrior. It is used for baby girls. Smith was the name for the one who worked with metals.

Spencer is a unisex name. It was an Old English title for the administrator or steward. Taylor is used for both boys and girls. It was the title for the one who mended clothes. Webster was the Middle English occupational name for the community weaver. Today, Webster is a masculine given name. Turner was the Scottish and British occupational name for the one who made items out of wood. Tucker was the Old English title for the one who treated newly made clothes. Travis is a given name for baby boys. The name began as a title for the toll collectors in the Middle English society.

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